Hell Is For Hyphenates – November 2017

Emma Westwood joins us to talk the films of Roman Polanski!

Author, journalist and film historian Emma Westwood is our guest this month, joining Rochelle and Lee to talk about some of the key films of November, including Kathryn Bigelow’s historical thriller Detroit (01:20), Kenneth Branagh’s Agatha Christie adaptation Murder on the Orient Express (05:26), Yorgos Lanthimos’s modern Greek tragedy The Killing of a Sacred Deer (08:05), and DC superhero team-up Justice League (13:20).

Then, in the wake of 2017’s massive revelations about sexual assault and harassment in the film industry, Emma, Rochelle and Lee discuss whether it is actually possible to separate the art from the artist, and whether it is permissible to enjoy the product of makers who turn out to be monsters (16:14).

Emma then introduces us to her filmmaker of the month, the French-Polish director Roman Polanski (28:46). From his early years in western Europe making short films and black-and-white features like Knife in the Water (1962), Repulsion (1965) and Cul-De-Sac (1966), Polanski soon found himself snapped up by Hollywood, where he made the game-changing horror Rosemary’s Baby (1968) and the classic film noir Chinatown (1974). After Chinatown, he famously and controversially fled the US, returning to Europe where he continued to direct. His subsequent films included titles such as Tess (1979), Frantic (1988), Bitter Moon (1992), The Pianist (2002), Carnage (2011) and more. Few filmmakers are as controversial or divisive as Polanski, and in addition to discussing the films themselves, we also examine how his personal life influenced his work, and how it influences our engagement with it.

Hell Is For Hyphenates – October 2017

Adam Elliot joins us to talk the films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet!

Oscar-winning filmmaker and animator Adam Elliot (Harvie KrumpetMary and MaxErnie Biscuit) is our guest this month, and chats to Rochelle and Lee about some of the key films of October 2017, including Denis Villeneuve’s ambitious sequel Blade Runner 2049 (01:12), Taika Waititi’s unconventional superhero sequel Thor: Ragnarok (13:00), Terrence Malick’s wistful love story Song To Song (17:35), and George Clooney’s dark comedy thriller Suburbicon (22:11).

Then, Adam tells us about his filmmaker of the month, the French writer-director Jean-Pierre Jeunet (26:13). Jeunet’s early years saw him collaborating with Marc Caro, and the pair directed a range of short films together before making the back-to-back classics Delicatessen (1991) and The City of Lost Children (1995). Jeunet then went solo, flirting briefly with Hollywood when he directed the fourth film in the Alien franchise, Alien: Resurrection (1997). He then returned to France to make more personal films such as Amelie (2001) and A Very Long Engagement (2004), as well as Micmacs (2009) and The Young and Prodigious TS Spivet (2013). Adam talks to us about Jeunet’s work and when he first became enamoured by his filmmaking.

We also take a diversion to look at the career of Marc Caro (39:11), and look at what he got up to following his collaboration with Jeunet.

Hell Is For Hyphenates – September 2017

Michael Ian Black joins us to talk the films of Sylvester Stallone!

We kick off this month by looking back at some of the key new releases, including Darren Aronofsky’s allegorical and grammatically-troubled mother! (00:50), Matthew Vaughan’s action sequel Kingsman: The Golden Circle (05:49), Andy Muschietti’s adaptation of the Stephen King classic It (09:32), and the popular Australian indie comedy That’s Not Me (13:57).

Lee then talks with this month’s guest, actor and writer Michael Ian Black (Wet Hot American SummerEdThis Is 40Another Period), to look at the films of writer/director/actor Sylvester Stallone. Stallone’s reputation as a muscle-bound 1980s action hero belies his work behind the camera, with a filmography that’s far more complex and thoughtful than he is often credited with. Michael takes us through this varied and fascinating career, and reveals his theory on what Sly’s films are really about (17:16).

Rochelle then rejoins the show to wrap up the episode and give her thoughts on Stallone’s filmography and the discussion with Michael. (55:16)

Hell Is For Hyphenates – August 2017

Edgar Wright joins us to talk the films of George Miller!

It’s an episode of some significance as we welcome Rochelle Siemienowicz on board as the new co-host of Hell Is For Hyphenates. Rochelle and Lee chat about some of the key new releases of this month, including Steven Soderbergh’s hillbilly heist Logan Lucky (02:04), Luc Besson’s sci-fi epic Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (08:21), Claire Denis’s comedic drama Let Sunshine In (13:39), and Agnès Varda’s rural France road trip documentary Faces Places (18:26).

Rochelle and Lee then look at the films and career of the legendary Australian director Dr George Miller, who redefined Oz cinema with the Mad Max franchise, and went on to make dramatic biopic Lorenzo’s Oil, supernatural comedy The Witches of Eastwick, dark fairytale Babe: Pig in the City, and socially-conscious animated musicals Happy Feet and Happy Feet Two. (24:38)

Lee then talks to writer/director Edgar Wright (Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz, Scott Pilgrim vs the World, The World’s EndBaby Driver) about the influence of Mad Max, the generational appeal of George Miller’s films, and what it’s like to receive both filmmaking and medical advice from Dr Miller himself! (47:35)

Hell Is For Hyphenates – July 2017

We open this episode with a fond farewell to Sophie, who is leaving the show after a tremendous two years! Memories are shared, tears are shed, and hugs are skyped. But the show must go on, and we are then joined by this month’s guest: author, editor and film critic Britt Hayes. Britt and Lee look at some of the key films from this month, including Christopher Nolan’s World War II drama Dunkirk, Sofia Coppola’s civil war era remake The Beguiled, the Matt Reeves prequel-sequel War For the Planet of the Apes, and Marvel Studio’s first solo Spider-man film, Spider-man: Homecoming. Then, Britt takes us through the films, career and style of her favourite filmmaker: American indie writer-director Wes Anderson.

Hell Is For Hyphenates – June 2017

We are joined this month by screenwriter and author C Robert Cargill (SinisterDoctor Strange) as we look back at some of the biggest films from this month, including Transformers: The Last KnightThe Mummy, and Wonder Woman. Then, noting that all the films we looked at are building blocks for multi-tiered franchises, we look at the future of shared cinematic universes and look at whether this kind of big-budget world-building has a proper formula, or if it’s doomed to failure. Then, Cargill talks to us about his screenwriting hero and the godfather of the Ozploitation movement, Everett De Roche. De Roche was responsible for PatrickRazorbackRoad Games and many other films that helped define Australia’s screen identity. So how did Cargill get into his films growing up in Texas, and what influence did De Roche’s writing have on him?

Hell Is For Hyphenates – May 2017

It’s the 7th anniversary of Hell Is For Hyphenates, and to mark the occasion we are joined by a guest who was, just last month, the subject of our filmmaker of the month segment: horror filmmaker Neil Marshall! We kick off this episode with reviews of some of this month’s films, including Jordan Peele’s horror comedy Get Out, Ridley Scott’s sequel-to-a-prequel Alien: Covenant, the fifth Pirates of the Caribbean film Dead Men Tell No Tales, and the British comedy film Mindhorn. Then Neil talks about what it’s like as a filmmaker to listen and read criticism of his films, and what influences that has on his work. Finally, Neil takes us through the films and career of one of his biggest inspirations, a director of comedy, horror, fantasy, and much more besides, Joe Dante!

Hell Is For Hyphenates – April 2017

Our guest this month is critic, film producer and horror aficionado Scott Weinberg. Sophie and Lee look back at some of the key films of this month, including James Gunn’s comic book sequel Guardians of the Galaxy vol. 2, Raoul Peck’s James Baldwin documentary I Am Not Your Negro, and Warren Beatty’s Howard Hughes biopic Rules Don’t Apply. Then Scott joins the show to look at the Netflix model of film distribution: is the streaming service making harder-to-find films more accessible by conveniently delivering them directly to your television set, or is its overabundance of content causing the smaller titles to disappear? Then Scott takes us through the career and works of his chosen filmmaker of the month, English horror director Neil Marshall.

Hell Is For Hyphenates – March 2017

Sophie and Lee kick off this month by looking at a pair of very different new release films: James Mangold’s Wolverine send-off Logan, and Sara Taksler’s documentary about Egypt’s legendary satirist Bassem Youssef, Tickling Giants. Then Sophie welcomes this month’s guest, filmmaker Jennifer Reeder, joining her to discuss her filmmaker-of-the-month: US indie auteur Allison Anders. After discussing the influence Anders had on Reeder, Sophie checks back in with Lee and wrap up with their own look over the films of Allison Anders, exploring the influence she had when she emerged in the 1980s and made her name in the 1990s.

Hell Is For Hyphenates – February 2017

We are joined this episode by film critic and author Tina Hassannia, as we look back at some of the key films of this month, including Ang Lee’s Billy Flynn’s Long Halftime Walk, Danny Boyle’s T2: Trainspotting, and Theodore Melfi’s Hidden Figures. Then, on the eve of an Academy Award ceremony that nominated Iranian filmmaker Asghar Farhadi has refused to attend in protest of the recent US travel ban, we ask what form awards shows should take during times of social anxiety and oppressive policy. We then look at the films and career of Asghar Farhadi, the award-winning Iranian filmmaker responsible for acclaimed works such as About Elly A SeparationThe Past and The Salesman. Finally, in a special bonus segment, Sophie attends the protest screening of The Salesman in Leicester Square, and provides us with audio of the speeches from journalist and TV presenter Mariella Frostrup, model and actress Lily Cole, Mayor of London Sadiq Khan, filmmaker Mike Leigh, and via pre-recorded video, Asghar Farhadi himself.