Tag Archives: what we do in the shadows

Hell Is For Hyphenates – December 2014

Arts journalist and broadcaster Richard Watts guest hosts this episode of Hyphenates, talking about the films of December 2014, comparing notes on the best films of the year, and looking at the films and career of indie filmmaker and key figure in the New Queer Cinema movement, Gregg Araki.

Win a Lynn Shelton DVD Pack!

Lynn Shelton Cover

The last competition we ran got such a great response, we thought we’d run another. Because giving you things gives us joy. Joy.

This September past we had the wonderful filmmaker Lynn Shelton on the show. Thanks to Madman Entertainment, we have a DVD set featuring three of Lynn’s films: Humpday, Your Sister’s Sister and Touchy Feely. But that’s not all! In that particular episode of Hyphenates, we reviewed the brilliantly funny New Zealand horror-comedy What We Do In The Shadows, and because Madman is so great, they’re also throwing that into the mix. We know. You’re like, “But that’s too much great stuff in one single competition!”, but we’re all about pleasure overload here at Hi4H HQ.

DVDs

To win the set, simply answer the following question:

In the September 2014 episode of Hell Is For Hyphenates, Lynn Shelton mentions the name of a film that is “absolutely in my top five list of films ever”. Which film is it and who directed it?

To enter, send your answer to competition@hellisforhyphenates.com by midnight on December 31 2014 AEST. All correct answers will be put into a gigantic electronic sorting machine or possibly a hat, and the winning entry will be drawn at random. The winner will then be notified by email.

If you don’t want to leave it to the fates, you can order the discs right this second from Madman: Humpday, Your Sister’s Sister, Touchy Feely, What We Do In The Shadows.

What We Do In The Shadows

Hell Is For Hyphenates – September 2014

Filmmaker Lynn Shelton (Humpday, Your Sister’s Sister, Laggies) joins us for this episode as we talk the new releases of September 2014, examine whether we’re less enamoured by directors who are more stylistically experimental, and delve into the works of French auteur Claire Denis.